Columns
Residents' Association Image

Residents' Association

20th AGM – What a milestone!
Read more >>

Owners Corporation Law Image

Owners Corporation Law

OC discriminated against a disabled owner
Read more >>

Montague Community Alliance

Can we be good neighbours?
Read more >>

Metro Tunnel

MetroHub opens its doors
Read more >>

Federal Politics Image

Federal Politics

Supporting the peaceful struggle of the Tibetans
Read more >>

We Live Here Image

We Live Here

One woman’s stand gets results
Read more >>

Southbanker Image

Southbanker

Giving the community a lift
Read more >>

Housing

We are losing our social licence to operate
Read more >>

History Image

History

Art Deco panels at the ABC
Read more >>

Southbank Sustainability Group

Community’s journey into sustainability
Read more >>

Health and Wellbeing Image

Health and Wellbeing

How to break the cycle of fear
Read more >>

Skypad Living Image

Skypad Living

Luv thy NABERS (for apartments)
Read more >>

Pets Corner Image

Pets Corner

Jumper’s proud parents
Read more >>

Southbank Fashion Image

Southbank Fashion

Spring racing in Southbank
Read more >>

Street Smarts Image

Street Smarts

Power Street – Southbank
Read more >>

Letters Image

Letters

Name it Domain!
Read more >>

Everything going green

15 May 2012

Everything going green Image

The City of Melbourne in partnership with three other councils and the University of Melbourne have launched a program encouraging businesses to turn walls, facades and even roofs of their buildings into green habitats.

In similar style to the Fyto green gardens on some buildings already in Southbank, the Growing Green Guide for Melbourne is an industry “how to guide” letting businesses of all sizes know how they can green up their outside office space.

Councillor Cathy Oke was thrilled with the idea and couldn’t wait to see more green around the city.

“Green roofs, walls and facades are an increasingly common sight on buildings in major cities around the world. They are now considered an essential part of urban design to provide more vegetation and green spaces in dense urban environments,” Cr Oke said.

John Rayner from the University of Melbourne said: “Green roofs and walls contribute significant environmental and amenity benifits to cities. They can reduce urban heat loadings and stormwater run-off, increase the energy efficiency and liveability of buildings, provide a range of habitat outcomes and even produce food.”

Stay in touch with Southbank. Subscribe to FREE monthly e-Newspaper.

You must be registered with Southbank Local News to be able to post comments.
To register, please click here.