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Residents' Association Image

Residents' Association

A massive win for City Rd
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Owners Corporation Law

Taking the plunge on defect claims
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Montague Community Alliance

Is having no third-party rights the new black?
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Housing

We are losing our social licence to operate
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Federal Politics

Michael Danby announces retirement
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We Live Here Image

We Live Here

Uniting against proxy farming and rorts
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Southbanker

Bringing the arts to life
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History Image

History

Meet you at the Malthouse!
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Skypad Living

Luv thy NABERS (for apartments)
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Health and Wellbeing

The psychology of persuasion
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Southbank Fashion

Spring racing in Southbank
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Street Smarts

Power Street – Southbank
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Letters

Name it Domain!
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Southbank or “Southsea”?

13 Jul 2017

Southbank or “Southsea”? Image

Almost all of Southbank could be underwater if sea level rises by two metres by 2100.

The latest data from Coastal Risk shows large parts of Southbank, especially the area around Crown Casino and South Wharf, could be submerged if climate change continues at the current pace.

Dr Kathleen McInnes, climate-change expert at CSIRO, said Southbank could be particularly vulnerable to sea level increase.

“Even storm surges now cause problems in some suburbs, so sea level rise will only make things worse,” she said.

“If sea levels rise by two metres then many coastal suburbs in Melbourne will be inundated, assuming no mitigation measures are put in place.”

Dr McInnes said a two-metre rise in sea level would be possible in a “business as usual” scenario.

“It really depends on whether or not strong cuts to carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions are realised,” she said.

“If emissions increase at the rate they currently are, we could reach a two-metre increase next century.”

Dr McInnes also offered some tips on how Southbank residents could help slow down sea level rise to save their home.

“Living more sustainably, using less, wasting less, recycling, supporting renewable energy solutions are all things we can all be doing to reduce our carbon footprint and help to slow the rate of sea level rise,” she said.

 

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