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Vault finds peace in Southbank

15 Oct 2012

Vault finds peace in Southbank Image

It was once one of the most talked about pieces of public art in Melbourne, but these days Vault is happy in the peaceful surrounds of Southbank.

As many Melburnians would be aware, when Vault was first unveiled in the City Square it was met with much controversy and angst, and gained the unfortunate nickname “Yellow Peril”.

After being moved to the out-of-the-way location of Batman Park, a decision was made to move it into the heart of the arts precinct here in Southbank.

Catherine Hockey, acting project manager for the City of Melbourne’s Art and Heritage Collection told Southbank Local News she thought, despite its controversial beginnings, Vault had now found a place in the general public’s heart.

“There are people around who have loved it from the outset and now many more people have come around to it,” Ms Hockey said.

“Calling it Vault again, rather than the Yellow Peril, puts it back into the public art realm rather than it being just a controversial piece.”

She also said the Arts and Heritage Collection, which organises all permanent outdoor art within the City of Melbourne, thinks it’s got the location right now.

“It’s an interesting site because it’s got the open space around it. Since Vault has been there, there hasn’t been anyone coming out and saying it shouldn’t be there.” Ms Hockey explained.

“Vault is not a memorial. It’s a very modern response to the city. I think it holds a special place with people now, because it was one of the first bold public artworks of its time.”

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