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Residents' Association

An exciting year ahead
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Business in Southbank

Unrivalled inner-city living
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St Johns Southgate

A place with that certain something
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Owners Corporation Law

10-year caretakers’ agreements
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Montague Community Alliance

Is Fishermans Bend stalling?
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Metro Tunnel

Anzac Station construction update
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Federal Politics

Why Magnitsky Act is important for Australia
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We Live Here

State government follows UK lead on cladding
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Southbanker

The physics of community
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Port Places

Fishermans Bend: the first quarter 2019
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Housing

We are leaving an intergenerational time bomb for our children
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History

High-pressure building boom hits Southbank!
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Yarra River Business Association

Sharing our “big ideas”
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Southbank Sustainability Group

Open House with environmental flair
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Health and Wellbeing

Emotional intelligence
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Skypad Living

High-density cycling
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Pets Corner

Pram-powered princess Sophia
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Southbank Fashion

Spring racing in Southbank
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Street Smarts

Power Street – Southbank
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Letters

A patch of green
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Sacred Sites

18 Mar 2014

The Tea House is one of the most recognisable buildings in Melbourne. It was constructed in 1889 and started life as a stationer’s warehouse and factory operated by printers Fergusson and Mitchell.

Nahum Barnet, who was a very well known architect in Melbourne during this time, designed the factory. It was acknowledged as extremely unique and modern because of the 350-timber piles system used as a foundation for the building. It needed the new foundation system because of the swamp-like land it was being built on.

The red brick façade is in line with its Victorian style and despite its lack of height (in comparison to new buildings) it remains an iconic figure in Southbank’s skyline.

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